Category Archives: Moral Stories

Journey to wisdom

My Journey to Wisdom
by Joyce Rupp

Once upon a time a child of happiness danced upon the land, knew friendship with the earth
and celebrated life with her love of solitude and simple things.

She grew into a young woman, whose vision of self was clouded, clothed with the complexities of insecurity and the necessity of leaving the hallowed womb of the quiet earth.
She walked into cities of strangers, straining her inner eye to catch the slightest hint of the beauty that had energized her younger days when she played upon the earth.
Days stretched into months and then years went by.
She slowly changed by going deeper, deeper, into her Center.
Never understanding why the desire to go deeper was there but always knowing there was no other choice than to follow at all costs.
Darkness often loomed up large against her searching journey.
Risk and Truth became her companions.
She met Compassion and then Wisdom came to greet her.
So close, at times, were these companions that she wept for their intensity and her unworthiness.
Still, they walked with her, and everywhere she went, her companions reached out and blessed the people of her life.
She could only kneel in gratitude, offering her heart of praise to the Divine Companion who had faithfully kept the kindling of love
burning in her heart.
Thoughts from the Author
I share my discovered wisdoms with you in order to encourage you on your own inner way and to spark the recognition of your wisdoms that are waiting to be welcomed by you…. My hope is that you will gather the gift of time and take the journey to the inner world where Sophia (Wisdom) waits for you. — Joyce Rupp

Advertisements

Thinking of others

Zhao Zi Hao’s made it big in business so he spent money buying a piece of land in the suburbs and built a three-storey villa.

He had an impressive swimming pool in the garden with a hundred-year-old Lychee Tree in the backyard to boot. In fact, he bought the property precisely because of this tree. His wife loved eating lychees.

During renovations, his friends urged him to get guidance from a fengshui master, just to tread on the side of caution.

Zhao Zi Hao’s never quite believed in Fengshui yet surprising he took the advice to heart and went out of his way to engage a feng shui master from Hong Kong. The Grand Master was non other than Master Cao who’s been in the profession for thirty over years, renowned in the Fengshui circle. They had a meal in the city then Zhao Zi Hao drove the Master to the suburbs.

Along the way, when cars behind them tried to overtake, Zhao Zi Hao would simply give way.

The Master laughingly remarked: “Big Boss Zhao, your driving is really safe.” He spoke really fluent mandarin for a Hongkie.

Zhao Zhi Hao laughed at the remark: “Usually people who need to overtake have some urgent matter to attend to, so we shouldn’t hold them up.

Arriving at a small town the streets grew narrow and so Zhao Zi Hao slowed down.

A giggling child suddenly darted out from an alley and as the child ran across the street, Zao still didn’t speed up. Instead, he kept his gaze on the alley, as if waiting for something. Out of the blue, another child darted out, chasing after the child ahead.

Master Zao was surprised and asked: “How did you know there’d be another child following suit?”

Zhao Zi Hao shrugged: “Well, kids are always chasing after each other so it’s impossible for a child to be in such glee without a playmate.”

Master Cao gave him a big thumbs up and laughed out loud: “That’s really considerate of you!”

Arriving at the Villa, they got down from the car. Suddenly about seven to eight birds flocked from the backyard. Seeing so, Zhao said to Master Cao: “ If you don’t mind please wait here for a little while.”

“What’s the matter?” Master Cao was taken aback.

“Oh, there’s probably some kids stealing lychees in the backyard. If we walk in now we might give them a fright, let’s not risk anyone falling off the old Lychee Tree.” Zhao replied humorously.

Master Cao stayed silent for a while before stating matter-of-factly: “This home doesn’t need a fengshui evaluation anymore.”

Now it’s Zhao’s turn to be shocked: “Why’s that?”

“Any place graced with your presence naturally becomes the property with the most auspicious fengshui.”

When our minds prioritize others’ peace and happiness, the one who benefits is not just others, but ourselves too.

World is mine

A Beautiful Poem..

*THE WORLD IS MINE*
(Author Unknown)

Today, upon a bus, I saw a very beautiful woman
and wished I were as beautiful.
When suddenly she rose to leave,
I saw her hobble down the aisle.
She had one leg and used a crutch.
But as she passed, she passed a smile.
Oh, God, forgive me when I whine.
I have two legs; the world is mine.

I stopped to buy some candy.
The lad who sold it had such charm.
I talked with him, he seemed so glad.
If I were late, it’d do no harm.
And as I left, he said to me,
“I thank you, you’ve been so kind.
It’s nice to talk with folks like you.
You see,” he said, “I’m blind.”
Oh, God, forgive me when I whine.
I have two eyes; the world is mine.

Later while walking down the street,
I saw a child I knew.
He stood and watched the others play,
but he did not know what to do.
I stopped a moment and then I said,
Why don’t you join them dear?”
He looked ahead without a word.
I forgot, he couldn’t hear.
Oh, God, forgive me when I whine.
I have two ears; the world is mine.

With feet to take me where I’d go,
With eyes to see the sunset’s glow,
With ears to hear what I’d know,
Oh, God, forgive me when I whine.
I’ve been blessed indeed, the world is mine.

_This poem is just a simple reminder that we have so much to be thankful for!_

I have been truly blessed with some very beautiful people in my life. And this comes as a token of thanks!🌹🌹🌹

Digging a way out

There’s a man who has been by himself in a prison cell with a dirt floor, crude stone walls, and there’s two windows one of which looks out towards the ocean. All of the sudden, he hears a scratching noise, and he looks down at the ground that is furthest away from the window facing the ocean. He sees the ground moving, and he starts to think he’s losing his mind. But soon the ground breaks, and up pops a head with long hair and a beard… it’s a prisoner.

And the prisoner says “Sssh. Listen. A group of us have been tunneling for about six years, and we’ve finally reached your cell. We have ways to cover up my entrance into this, but now it’s all on your shoulders, man. All you have to do,” he said while pointing out the window towards the ocean, “you just start digging here and go down about six feet and about 75 feet in that direction and there is freedom, and we’re outta here!”

“Oh, I love that! That’s great; I want to be free!”

“Okay, I’ll check back with you in a few weeks.”

Two weeks later, he pops back in to check on his friend’s progress, and his friend nods back with great affirmation. “Yeah, I’ve done it.”

So the man who was providing the instructions pops down the hole, and two seconds later pops right back up and says, “What have you done?!?!?”

“Huh?”

“I told you to dig in the direction towards the OCEAN! This tunnel that you dug goes back under the wall and into the prison yard.”

“Well, the digging was easier in the other direction…”

*We are born as free but got ourselves entrapped in a self created prison . Our goal is to free ourselves …dig towards the ocean of joy*

The Runner

I read this amazing true story of Lata Bhagwan Khare. Lets read and be inspired by her great willpower. 
Lata Bhagwan Khare, a 65 year old resident of an small village in Buldhana district in Maharashtra, lived with her three daughters and husband. She and her husband worked very hard throughout their lives and married off their daughters. All the savings which they gathered over the years were spent on these marriages.
Post daughter’s marriages, she and her husband started working as daily wage workers in the nearby farms, they used to make enough to survive.
One day suddenly, her husband felt uneasy and was diagnosed with some serious infection. Lataji was left baffled, with no money in hand and the creepy situation, she couldn’t understand what to do. She took him to the nearby government hospital, doctors recommended her to take him to the terminal hospital in Baramati as few tests had to be conducted. Lataji was in tears, she felt pity on her misery. She couldn’t see her husband dying in her arms. She felt helpless and sorrowful.
Courageously, she begged her neighbours, relatives and every possible person she could and gathered a small amount and left for Baramati for the further tests of her husband.
Doctor moved her husband in the check-up zone, she discreetly sat outside the room with the teary eyes, praying god to save the only wisdom in her life. Doctor came out of the check-up ward, her eyes lit, eagerly waiting to hear the well-being of her love. But Fate had some other story written for them, Doctor advised further costly tests and medications, which were going to cost them a bounty. Lataji’s world collapsed with her nowhere to go, no money to treat her husband. Her world was shattered, her heart ached, overwhelmed by emotions, she cried with helplessness.
They came out of the hospital heavy-heartedly, stopped by nearby samosawala, had two samosas on piece of newspaper, her eyes stopped on the bold Marathi headline on the newspaper, her eyes lit, heart skipped. The headline was about the ‘Baramati Marathon and it’s prize money’. She was excited and all sorts of thoughts flooded her mind.
Next day, Baramati Marathon was about to commence, everyone geared up in their sports shoes, cozy shorts and tracks, sweat absorbing tees. And there she comes, the 67 year old Lata Bhagwan Khare, wearing torn saree (lugda), bare footed, tears in her eyes. She argued with the organizers, they weren’t ready to let her participate in the marathon, she pleaded, she begged, she convinced them to approve her participation.
Marathon started, she hitched her saree just above her ankles, she ran like a wizard, like a 16 year old teen, she didn’t think of anything else, she could just see her husband’s agony and the winning amount in front of her eyes ahead. She didn’t care about the hard hitting rocks and pebbles on her way, her feet bled, but she ran and ran. She won the marathon and was awarded the prize amount. It meant a life to her, she was going to see her husband live. Crowd cheered her, streets of Baramati clapped for her. People were flabbergasted, they saluted her and applauded her.
She collected the winning amount and made sure her husband received the proper medication. This is love, this is devotion. She didn’t blink an eye, she never thought about how she is going to win the marathon, how is she going to run barefooted, how’ll she survive. She only ran with one motive, to save her husband.
I salute Lata Bhagwan Khare, for her courage and fortitude. In the world full of excuses, you just proved to be an icon.

Lost Goats

There was once a goatherd named Zhang San. He raised many goats by the side of his house. One morning, as usual, before he started herding the goats, he counted them one by one. After counting and recounting for several times, he found out that one was missing. “Why do my goats decrease one?” scratching the back of his head, wondering. After investigating, he noticed that there was hole somewhere in the barn wall, that must be the cause, he thought.

Seeing it, his neighbor advised Zhang San to immediately fix the barn so that he wouldn’t lost more goats. But Zhang San pass the advice. He only replied, “I have lost one goat. Now it is too late even to fix the barn. Just let it be.”

The next morning, when counted, out of his surprise, his goat decreased by one again. This time he regretted. This time he immediately fixed his barn. After the barn was fixed, there was no more missing goat.

Even the smallest mistake should be handled immediately, should not wait until the problem get bigger. The bigger the problem, the more complex it is to fix it, the more time is needed and the more costly it is. Every mistake should also be analyzed, understand the roots, and make it as guidepost for future actions. Thus, not repeating the same mistake.

In the above story, if only Zhang San heed his neighbour’s advice, he wouldn’t have lost two goats.

 

The Apple Tree

A long time ago, there was a huge apple tree. A little boy loved to come and play around it everyday. He climbed to the treetop, ate the apples, and took a nap under the shadow. He loved the tree and the tree loved to play with him. Time went by, the little boy had grown up and he no longer played around the tree every day.

One day, the boy came back to the tree and he looked sad.

“Come and play with me”, the tree asked the boy.

“I am no longer a kid, I do not play around trees any more” the boy replied.

“I want toys. I need money to buy them.”

“Sorry, but I do not have money, but you can pick all my apples and sell them. So, you will have money.”

The boy was so excited. He grabbed all the apples on the tree and left happily. The boy never came back after he picked the apples. The tree was sad.

One day, the boy who now turned into a man returned and the tree was excited.

“Come and play with me” the tree said.

“I do not have time to play. I have to work for my family. We need a house for shelter. Can you help me?”

“Sorry, but I do not have any house. But you can chop off my branches to build your house”. So the man cut all the branches of the tree and left happily. The tree was glad to see him happy but the man never came back since then. The tree was again lonely and sad.

One hot summer day, the man returned and the tree was delighted.

“Come and play with me!” the tree said.

“I am getting old. I want to go sailing to relax myself. Can you give me a boat?” said the man.

“Use my trunk to build your boat. You can sail far away and be happy.”

So the man cut the tree trunk to make a boat. He went sailing and never showed up for a long time.

Finally, the man returned after many years. “Sorry, my boy. But I do not have anything for you anymore. No more apples for you”, the tree said.

“No problem, I do not have any teeth to bite” the man replied.

“No more trunk for you to climb on”.

“I am too old for that now” the man said.

“I really cannot give you anything, the only thing left is my dying roots,” the tree said with tears.

“I do not need much now, just a place to rest. I am tired after all these years,” the man replied.

“Good! Old tree roots are the best place to lean on and rest, come sit down with me and rest.” The man sat down and the tree was glad and smiled with tears.

This is a story (Parents Sacrifice for Children) of everyone. The tree is like our parents. When we were young, we loved to play with our Mum and Dad. When we grow up, we leave them; only come to them when we need something or when we are in trouble.

No matter what, parents will always be there and give everything they could just to make you happy.

You may think the boy is cruel to the tree, but that is how all of us treat our parents. We take them for granted; we don’t appreciate all they do for us, until it’s too late

The story of an ant

One morning I wasted nearly an hour watching a tiny ant carry a huge feather across my back terrace. Several times it was confronted by obstacles in its path and after a momentary pause it would make the necessary detour. At one point the ant had to negotiate a crack in the concrete about 10mm wide. After brief contemplation the ant laid the feather over the crack, walked across it and picked up the feather on the other side then continued on its way.

I was fascinated by the ingenuity of this ant, one of God’s smallest creatures. It served to reinforce the miracle of creation. Here was a minute insect, lacking in size yet equipped with a brain to reason, explore, discover and overcome. But this ant, like the two-legged co-residents of this planet, also shares human failings. After some time the ant finally reached its destination – a flower bed at the end of the terrace and a small hole that was the entrance to its underground home. And it was here that the ant finally met its match. How could that large feather possibly fit down that small hole? Of course it couldn’t. So the ant, after all this trouble and exercising great ingenuity, overcoming problems all along the way, just abandoned the feather and went home.

The ant had not thought the problem through before it began its epic journey and in the end the feather was nothing more than a burden. Isn’t life like that! We worry about our family, we worry about money or the lack of it, we worry about work, about where we live, about all sorts of things. These are all burdens – the things we pick up along life’s path and lug them around the obstacles and over the crevasses that life will bring, only to find that at the destination they are useless and we can’t take them with us

 

Story of being

A nurse took the tired, anxious serviceman to the bedside.

“Your son is here,” she said to the old man. She had to repeat the words several times before the patient’s eyes opened.

Heavily sedated because of the pain of his heart attack, he dimly saw the young uniformed Marine standing outside the oxygen tent. He reached out his hand. The Marine wrapped his toughened fingers around the old man’s limp ones, squeezing a message of love and encouragement.

The nurse brought a chair so that the Marine could sit beside the bed. All through the night the young Marine sat there in the poorly lighted ward, holding the old man’s hand and offering him words of love and strength. Occasionally, the nurse suggested that the Marine move away and rest awhile.

He refused. Whenever the nurse came into the ward, the Marine was oblivious of her and of the night noises of the hospital – the clanking of the oxygen tank, the laughter of the night staff members exchanging greetings, the cries and moans of the other patients.

Now and then she heard him say a few gentle words. The dying man said nothing, only held tightly to his son all through the night.

Along towards dawn, the old man died. The Marine released the now lifeless hand he had been holding and went to tell the nurse. While she did what she had to do, he waited.

Finally, she returned. She started to offer words of sympathy, but the Marine interrupted her.

“Who was that man?” he asked.

The nurse was startled, “He was your father,” she answered.

“No, he wasn’t,” the Marine replied.

“I never saw him before in my life.”

“Then why didn’t you say something when I took you to him?”

“I knew right away there had been a mistake, but I also knew he needed his son, and his son just wasn’t here. When I realized that he was too sick to tell whether or not I was his son, knowing how much he needed me, I stayed.

via Story of being.

Story of unique human flaws

An elderly asian woman had two large pots, each hung on the end of a pole, which she carried across her neck.

One of the pots had a crack in it while the other pot was perfect and always delivered a full portion of water. At the end of the long walk from the stream to the house, the cracked pot arrived only half full.

For two years, this went on daily with the woman bringing home only one and a half pots of water. The perfect pot was proud of its accomplishments. The poor cracked pot was ashamed of its own imperfection and miserable that it could only do half of what it had been made to do.

After 2 years of what it perceived to be bitter failure, it spoke to the woman: “I am ashamed of myself because this crack in my side causes water to leak out all the way to your house.”

The old woman smiled, “Did you notice that there are flowers on your side of the path, but not on the other pot’s side?”

“That’s because I have always known about your flaw so I planted flower seeds on your side of the path, and every day while we walk back, you water them. For two years I have been able to pick these beautiful flowers to decorate the table. Without you being just the way you are, there would not be this beauty to grace the house.”

Moral: Like the pots, we all have our own unique flaws. But it’s the cracks and flaws we each have that make our lives together so very interesting and rewarding

via Story of unique human flaws.